One Month Later

Hello everyone!

It’s been a while since my last post, so it seems fitting to give y’all an update on our seedlings.

Last week, temperatures plummeted to as low as about 22 degrees Fahrenheit and the sun spent a lot of its time hiding behind the clouds. Not your ideal growing conditions! We’ve also recently had sleet, hail, thunderstorms, snow, and after all of this we had 80 degree weather today. It has seriously been ALL over the place!! And yet, we still have pansies in full bloom, roses growing leaves, a hydrangea growing some greenery, a couple peonies, and we just saw our first sign of green on an azalea. On top of all that, our first raised bed for the cool weather plants has been thriving. In fact, I had to thin out the lettuce so that it can start to focus on growing into heads of lettuce.

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I know it’s almost impossible to see some of the seedlings, but we have a ton of Cosmic Purple Carrots (Baker Creek), Matador Spinach (Ferrymorse), Buttercrunch Lettuce (Baker Creek), and of course chives (Ferrymorse). This photo was before I thinned out the lettuce (there was a lot extra!). Can you tell where in the lettuce one of our furbabies walked through right after I planted the seeds? 🙂

We also have the first sprouts of Tall Top Early Wonder Beets (Ferrymorse).

About a month ago or so, there were only chives that had been transplanted. A lot happens in just a month in the gardening world! Unless you’re parsley being grown in soil from a seed. Then you likely aren’t doing much at all. Good thing we used the paper towel method for parsley this year!

Let’s check out the progress during this past month:

Parsley photographed February 19th and later on March 19th. Growth seemed to improve when it was inside the portable greenhouse.

Peppers photographed February 21st and March 18th. The first picture was right after planting the germinated seeds. Following advice from The Vegetable Gardener’s Bible, the peppers spent time outside in the cooler weather for a few weeks after germinating. 

There are also tomatoes 2 weeks old that are growing true leaves, and many other seedlings that are really starting to take off. The one thing we have really struggled with, is making sure the containers don’t dry out and stress the seedlings. We had this happen and lost a few, which was super sad! But, you know what is a great solution? Using those aluminum lasagna pans you normally use in the freezer. They come with plastic lids and aluminum pans. We had some on hand for freezer meals, so we put those to use. You can water from the bottom of the tray and it keeps the seedlings from drying out in the hot sun.

One last side note, the Buttercrunch Lettuce is one of my candidates this season for seed saving. Baker Creek shares online that there are no patents on their seeds, they are heirlooms, and they actually encourage people to share and save seeds (which is REALLY awesome). The Buttercrunch, being from Baker Creek and an easy veggie to start saving seeds from, is likely going to be in a later post about seed saving. And with all of this intense and variable weather, those seeds are going to produce some hardy plants in the next season! That’s why I’m so excited to start saving seeds for heirlooms using Baker Creek seeds. It’ll actually feel like our plants become better fitted for our growing seasons. The strongest plants survive, and those seeds go on to grow stronger plants. How awesome is that? Looks like my past school science knowledge is actually starting to have real world relevance.

I hope your seedlings are growing strong! And as always, have fun crafting your garden!

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